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Content services strategy considerations to keep pace with the digital era

 
December 14, 2017

By 2020, 15% of enterprises are likely to drop their traditional ECM (Enterprise Content Management) provider in favor of someone offering consumer like content services. 2020 is not too far away. Both providers and enterprises need to respond to market dynamics to manage content in a digital world.

Traditionally ECM was a large and complex initiative involving a central repository as a single source of content. So, enterprises required long drawn initiatives to find various sources of content. Massive efforts went into understanding ownership and business functionality, appropriately indexing content, and storing it securely. They had their own share of risks and user acceptance challenges. There were functionality and skill gaps, customization needs, an ever evolving technology landscape, and no consensus between various LoBs. Therefore, these programs turned out to be never ending.

So what has changed?

Today, 93% of enterprises have three or more diverse repositories, and several terabytes content distributed across cloud and on premise. Millennials will soon form 75% of the global workforce demanding intuitive user  interfaces. Compliance requirements continue to play a vital role governing content service implementations.

Points to consider while reviewing your content services strategy

As an enterprise leader, you are at a juncture today, coerced to review and revise your ECM or content services strategy by the evolving digitalization era.

  • Unification of user interface to enable seamless access and transparent delivery of content from a single, federated, intuitive user interface.  Since your content may reside in multiple back-end systems and heterogeneous environments, this unification strategy could be complex. Therefore, opt for a repository agnostic, metadata driven approach for cost effective content migrations. This approach also enables your users to get the right content irrespective of where it resides.
  • Automate categorization and classification by mining content and context, to enable programmed metadata tagging of massive content. This improves your chances of finding relevant information, with minimal manual intervention. This will also enable automated metadata based application of retention, disposition, and archival rules, thereby improving your adherence to compliance.
  • Explore cognitive analytics platforms capable of conducting unstructured content analysis across documents. These platforms should be good enough to provide insights on your customers, their problems, queries and past resolutions. With these insights, you can harness the vast knowledge residing within the content to make informed decisions.
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning will fundamentally change how we manage content. Content services vendors are exploring means to incorporate AI into their offerings. Examples are image recognition, auto tagging, semantically based intelligent summaries, and process automation. As an early adopter, you stand to gain from AI adding value to your business processes.
  • Workplace reimagination should include consumer grade user experiences, integrated collaboration tools, simplified business processes, and automation. This will help you to improve employee experience and engagement to match the expectations of your millennial workforce and changing work patterns.
  • The hybrid cloud ranks high in customer strategies and by 2018, 50% of enterprises are expected to adopt this model. So, do not just look at SaaS solutions that create multiple information silos. Have a unified cloud strategy, understand the legal, compliance and retention requirements, and choose products that seamlessly integrate with each other. Look for partners that have considerable experience supporting and take advantage of the cloud services of the public cloud vendor.

Content ServicesBy 2020, 15% of enterprises are likely to drop their traditional ECM (Enterprise Content Management) provider in favor of someone offering consumer like content services. 2020 is not too far away. Both providers and enterprises need to respond to market dynamics to manage content in a digital world.

Traditionally ECM was a large and complex initiative involving a central repository as a single source of content. So, enterprises required long drawn initiatives to find various sources of content. Massive efforts went into understanding ownership and business functionality, appropriately indexing content, and storing it securely. They had their own share of risks and user acceptance challenges. There were functionality and skill gaps, customization needs, an ever evolving technology landscape, and no consensus between various LoBs. Therefore, these programs turned out to be never ending.

So what has changed?

Today, 93% of enterprises have three or more diverse repositories, and several terabytes content distributed across cloud and on premise. Millennials will soon form 75% of the global workforce demanding intuitive user  interfaces. Compliance requirements continue to play a vital role governing content service implementations.

Points to consider while reviewing your content services strategy

As an enterprise leader, you are at a juncture today, coerced to review and revise your ECM or content services strategy by the evolving digitalization era.

  • Unification of user interface to enable seamless access and transparent delivery of content from a single, federated, intuitive user interface.  Since your content may reside in multiple back-end systems and heterogeneous environments, this unification strategy could be complex. Therefore, opt for a repository agnostic, metadata driven approach for cost effective content migrations. This approach also enables your users to get the right content irrespective of where it resides.
  • Automate categorization and classification by mining content and context, to enable programmed metadata tagging of massive content. This improves your chances of finding relevant information, with minimal manual intervention. This will also enable automated metadata based application of retention, disposition, and archival rules, thereby improving your adherence to compliance.
  • Explore cognitive analytics platforms capable of conducting unstructured content analysis across documents. These platforms should be good enough to provide insights on your customers, their problems, queries and past resolutions. With these insights, you can harness the vast knowledge residing within the content to make informed decisions.
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning will fundamentally change how we manage content. Content services vendors are exploring means to incorporate AI into their offerings. Examples are image recognition, auto tagging, semantically based intelligent summaries, and process automation. As an early adopter, you stand to gain from AI adding value to your business processes.
  • Workplace reimagination should include consumer grade user experiences, integrated collaboration tools, simplified business processes, and automation. This will help you to improve employee experience and engagement to match the expectations of your millennial workforce and changing work patterns.
  • The hybrid cloud ranks high in customer strategies and by 2018, 50% of enterprises are expected to adopt this model. So, do not just look at SaaS solutions that create multiple information silos. Have a unified cloud strategy, understand the legal, compliance and retention requirements, and choose products that seamlessly integrate with each other. Look for partners that have considerable experience supporting and take advantage of the cloud services of the public cloud vendor.

Content ServicesBy 2020, 15% of enterprises are likely to drop their traditional ECM (Enterprise Content Management) provider in favor of someone offering consumer like content services. 2020 is not too far away. Both providers and enterprises need to respond to market dynamics to manage content in a digital world.

Traditionally ECM was a large and complex initiative involving a central repository as a single source of content. So, enterprises required long drawn initiatives to find various sources of content. Massive efforts went into understanding ownership and business functionality, appropriately indexing content, and storing it securely. They had their own share of risks and user acceptance challenges. There were functionality and skill gaps, customization needs, an ever evolving technology landscape, and no consensus between various LoBs. Therefore, these programs turned out to be never ending.

So what has changed?

Today, 93% of enterprises have three or more diverse repositories, and several terabytes content distributed across cloud and on premise. Millennials will soon form 75% of the global workforce demanding intuitive user  interfaces. Compliance requirements continue to play a vital role governing content service implementations.

Points to consider while reviewing your content services strategy

As an enterprise leader, you are at a juncture today, coerced to review and revise your ECM or content services strategy by the evolving digitalization era.

  • Unification of user interface to enable seamless access and transparent delivery of content from a single, federated, intuitive user interface.  Since your content may reside in multiple back-end systems and heterogeneous environments, this unification strategy could be complex. Therefore, opt for a repository agnostic, metadata driven approach for cost effective content migrations. This approach also enables your users to get the right content irrespective of where it resides.
  • Automate categorization and classification by mining content and context, to enable programmed metadata tagging of massive content. This improves your chances of finding relevant information, with minimal manual intervention. This will also enable automated metadata based application of retention, disposition, and archival rules, thereby improving your adherence to compliance.
  • Explore cognitive analytics platforms capable of conducting unstructured content analysis across documents. These platforms should be good enough to provide insights on your customers, their problems, queries and past resolutions. With these insights, you can harness the vast knowledge residing within the content to make informed decisions.
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning will fundamentally change how we manage content. Content services vendors are exploring means to incorporate AI into their offerings. Examples are image recognition, auto tagging, semantically based intelligent summaries, and process automation. As an early adopter, you stand to gain from AI adding value to your business processes.
  • Workplace reimagination should include consumer grade user experiences, integrated collaboration tools, simplified business processes, and automation. This will help you to improve employee experience and engagement to match the expectations of your millennial workforce and changing work patterns.
  • The hybrid cloud ranks high in customer strategies and by 2018, 50% of enterprises are expected to adopt this model. So, do not just look at SaaS solutions that create multiple information silos. Have a unified cloud strategy, understand the legal, compliance and retention requirements, and choose products that seamlessly integrate with each other. Look for partners that have considerable experience supporting and take advantage of the cloud services of the public cloud vendor.

Content ServicesBy 2020, 15% of enterprises are likely to drop their traditional ECM (Enterprise Content Management) provider in favor of someone offering consumer like content services. 2020 is not too far away. Both providers and enterprises need to respond to market dynamics to manage content in a digital world.

Traditionally ECM was a large and complex initiative involving a central repository as a single source of content. So, enterprises required long drawn initiatives to find various sources of content. Massive efforts went into understanding ownership and business functionality, appropriately indexing content, and storing it securely. They had their own share of risks and user acceptance challenges. There were functionality and skill gaps, customization needs, an ever evolving technology landscape, and no consensus between various LoBs. Therefore, these programs turned out to be never ending.

So what has changed?

Today, 93% of enterprises have three or more diverse repositories, and several terabytes content distributed across cloud and on premise. Millennials will soon form 75% of the global workforce demanding intuitive user  interfaces. Compliance requirements continue to play a vital role governing content service implementations.

Points to consider while reviewing your content services strategy

As an enterprise leader, you are at a juncture today, coerced to review and revise your ECM or content services strategy by the evolving digitalization era.

  • Unification of user interface to enable seamless access and transparent delivery of content from a single, federated, intuitive user interface.  Since your content may reside in multiple back-end systems and heterogeneous environments, this unification strategy could be complex. Therefore, opt for a repository agnostic, metadata driven approach for cost effective content migrations. This approach also enables your users to get the right content irrespective of where it resides.
  • Automate categorization and classification by mining content and context, to enable programmed metadata tagging of massive content. This improves your chances of finding relevant information, with minimal manual intervention. This will also enable automated metadata based application of retention, disposition, and archival rules, thereby improving your adherence to compliance.
  • Explore cognitive analytics platforms capable of conducting unstructured content analysis across documents. These platforms should be good enough to provide insights on your customers, their problems, queries and past resolutions. With these insights, you can harness the vast knowledge residing within the content to make informed decisions.
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning will fundamentally change how we manage content. Content services vendors are exploring means to incorporate AI into their offerings. Examples are image recognition, auto tagging, semantically based intelligent summaries, and process automation. As an early adopter, you stand to gain from AI adding value to your business processes.
  • Workplace reimagination should include consumer grade user experiences, integrated collaboration tools, simplified business processes, and automation. This will help you to improve employee experience and engagement to match the expectations of your millennial workforce and changing work patterns.
  • The hybrid cloud ranks high in customer strategies and by 2018, 50% of enterprises are expected to adopt this model. So, do not just look at SaaS solutions that create multiple information silos. Have a unified cloud strategy, understand the legal, compliance and retention requirements, and choose products that seamlessly integrate with each other. Look for partners that have considerable experience supporting and take advantage of the cloud services of the public cloud vendor.

Lekha is an Enterprise Content Management Solution Architect with close to two decades of experience, whose current role is to lead ECM Strategy Consulting engagements, define solution architecture, lead technical designs, and handle presales for large and transformational deals. Accomplished in Content management, Records Management, Imaging and scanning technologies, in particular IBM FileNet, EMC Documentum and Captiva, Kofax, and Alfresco, she has also focused on Cloud ECM. Certified in AIIM Information Governance and TOGAF 8.1, and a certified IBM Bluemix and AWS Cloud Solutions Architect, she has spent the last three years as lead Consultant engaging with clients to understand their ECM landscape, analyze and define their road map, assess maturity, select the right product, calculate RoI and help customers make informed decisions to meet their goals